Posts tagged ‘The Dressmaker of Khair Khana’

Vote for The Dressmaker of Khair Khanna! @gaylelemmon #hwhtw

The Dressmaker of Khair Khanna, an HWHTW favorite book, has been nominated for a “Goodreads Choice Award” for Best History & Biography.  Your vote can make the difference!

Vote here: http://www.goodreads.com/award/choice/2011#55899-Best-History-&-Biography

November 4, 2011 at 3:33 pm Leave a comment

#DTDW: “We need to think beyond microenterprise”

More from the Democracy that Delivers for Women Conference:

This morning’s panel featured three women with expertise in women’s entrepreneurship efforts, and all of them echoed the same sentiment: For women to move forward, the focus must move from microenterprise to mainstream small and medium businesses – and beyond. 

Selima Ahmad, President and Founder of the Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry, offered a provocative question: “We need to give deep thought to micro entrepreneurs – are they part of the mainstream economy?”  She added, “We need to think beyond microenterprise.”

Mary Schnack of Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) agreed: “Women don’t need to be sitting on a dirt floor to need help growing their businesses.”  Women who are already running businesses need additional skills to scale up, she noted.

Gayle Lemmon, author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khanna, identified access to markets and financing as the biggest obstacle to growing women’s businesses.  She noted that in countries where women cannot legally own property, they cannot get financing because they cannot offer collateral.

June 20, 2011 at 5:00 pm Leave a comment

Book Discussion: The Dressmaker of Khair Khana

If you’re in the D.C. area, join the Women’s Foreign Policy Group for a discussion of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana with author (and HWHTW favorite) Gayle Tzemach Lemmon.

“In The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, journalist and author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of Kamela Sediqi, the unlikely breadwinner who became an entrepreneur in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Desperate to support her brothers and sisters and unable to earn a living outside the home, she started a dressmaking business in her living room which offered work to 100 women in her community. Together these unsung heroines made the difference between survival and starvation for their families under Taliban rule.”


Thursday, March 17, 2011, 5:30 p.m.
Reception and Program

Academy for Educational Development
1875 Connecticut Ave., NW, 8th Floor Board Room
Washington, DC

The program will be followed by a book signing with the author, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon.
Space is limited. Advance registration is required.

Click here to register

WFPG Members— $15      Non-Members— $20

March 13, 2011 at 2:30 pm Leave a comment

Greg Mortenson Interviews Gayle Tzemach Lemmon on Amazon

Greg Mortenson of Three Cups of Tea Fame interviewed Gayle Lemmon on her new book, The Dressmaker of Khair Khana.  Here’s a teaser:

Greg Mortenson: In The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, Kamila and her sisters sew a collection of wedding dresses overnight for a wedding party they later find out is connected to the Taliban. How did writing this book affect your view of the Taliban period?

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon: That scene in the book captures precisely the extraordinary complexity of the period. Reporting on the Taliban period I quickly learned there were many different views of what those years were like, depending on who you were, what you did, and where you lived. A lot of women I knew, including, of course, Kamila, told me stories about local Talibs who knew of their work and even helped them to keep it going. And they said that many of the Taliban in their neighborhood were men they had known for years who simply needed to support their families. What I kept coming back to—and what moved me deeply during so many conversations with young women , some of them tearful—was the raw loss they felt at having been deprived of five and a half years of education. And yet even amid all that despair they found ways to come together to build a community for the sake of their families. We are so used to seeing women as victims of war to be pitied rather than survivors of war to be respected. I really hope The Dressmaker of Khair Khana does its small part to change that.



To read the rest of the interview: http://www.amazon.com/Dressmaker-Khair-Khana-Remarkable-Everything/dp/0061732370/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1296786139&sr=8-1

February 10, 2011 at 4:45 pm 3 comments


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