Posts tagged ‘India’

Room to Read: “Promoting Literacy. Empowering Girls.” @RoomtoRead #hwhtw

Room to Read works in collaboration with communities and local governments across Asia and Africa to develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children, and support girls to complete secondary school with the life skills they’ll need to succeed in school and beyond.  Room to Read has distributed 10 million books and reached 6 million children so far.

If you’ll be in DC on May 3rd, you can support Room to Read in style at the DC Spring Gala and Dinner!  To learn more about the gala, register, or make a donation even if you can’t attend: http://www.roomtoread.org/document.doc?id=624

And to learn more about Room to Read: http://www.roomtoread.org

April 11, 2012 at 12:09 pm Leave a comment

HWHTW is Global! #hwhtw

WordPress has (finally) started showing info on where our blogs’ readers are coming from, and wow!  All the orange on this map shows that HWHTW is being read all over the world.  HWHTW readers hail from 77 countries – our biggest following is in the U.S., followed by India, the UK, Canada, Australia, and Pakistan.  We’ve also had visitors from Belgium, Brazil, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Botswana, Bahrain… and that’s just the ones that start with “B”!  Welcome, everyone, and thanks for spreading the word about HWHTW!

March 17, 2012 at 12:12 pm Leave a comment

“The Third Billion” #hwhtw

The Third Billion

As growing numbers of women enter the economic mainstream, they will have a profound effect on global business.

by DeAnne Aguirre and Karim Sabbagh

A huge and fast-growing group of people are poised to take their place in the economic mainstream over the next decade, as producers, consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. This group’s impact on the global economy will be at least as significant as that of China and India’s billion-plus populations. But its members have not yet attracted the level of attention they deserve.

If China and India each represent 1 billion emerging participants in the global marketplace, then this “third billion” is made up of women, in both developing and industrialized nations, whose economic lives have previously been stunted, underleveraged, or suppressed…

Read the full article: http://www.strategy-business.com/article/10211?gko=98895

December 5, 2011 at 11:39 am Leave a comment

“Why Are India’s Women So Stressed Out?” @hbr #hwhtw

Does empowering women make them more stressed out?  This Harvard Business Review article by Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Ripa Rashid looks at the data:

“According to “Women of Tomorrow,” a recent Nielsen survey of 6,500 women across 21 different nations, Indian women are the most stressed in the world today. An overwhelming 87% of Indian women said they felt stressed most of the time, and 82% reported that they had no time to relax.

“The Nielsen survey’s respondents blame the difficulty of juggling multiple roles at home and work. Career opportunities for women in “the New India” are rapidly expanding, but family expectations and social mores remain rooted in tradition.”

Read the full article: http://blogs.hbr.org/hbr/hewlett/2011/08/why_are_indias_women_so_stress.html

September 23, 2011 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

Inside Teach for India

For the next two years, Devanik Saha will be teaching at a government-run school for low-income girls in India as part of the Teach for India program.  His blog post for the Women’s Worldwide Web recounts some of the challenges and successes of his first few days on the job.  A few excerpts:

“I packed myself into an auto-rickshaw and pressed myself against other passengers for the jerkiest, most painful ride to school of my life—I kept telling myself, “This is nothing. I am here for the kids whose lives I want to transform for the better.’  Arriving enthusiastically at the school, I waited for all my students to arrive. After 15 to 20 minutes, only six girls out of a class of thirty had turned up.”

“What has struck me is how much more there is to teaching than formal teaching activities; it’s not just about instructing pupils in academic subjects like maths and English. I try to be as supportive as possible of the children and their families as they deal with certain sensitive issues—such as family and community problems and their difficult financial circumstances. I have tried to embrace these challenges with love and care. By developing relationships with the parents, listening to their hopes, frustrations, aspirations, and feelings of helplessness, I hope I will be more effective in my efforts to teach their children and to create a culture in which the children are encouraged to learn.”

“The principal and school administration investigated and were indignant when they learned that the pupils had indeed been deprived of their lunch. We agreed that I could be responsible for supervising the lunch distribution, ensuring that the lunch was distributed fairly and allowing the school helpers to keep any remaining leftovers for their families. I was also pleasantly surprised when a van arrived at the school an hour later to unload two large containers of food for my class!”

Read the full article: http://www.womensworldwideweb.org/?q=Devanik%20Teach%20for%20India%201

August 23, 2011 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

“In India, Maids Need Protection and Respect”

Sister Jeanne DevosDomestic workers face serious workplace dangers:  human trafficking, underpayment, beatings, sexual exploitation, and forcible confinement.  The International Labor Organization’s Convention on Domestic Workers was approved by over 100 countries, including India, in June, and India’s domestic workers are hopeful that it will mean an improvement in their working conditions.

From the New York Times:

“The situation is changing rather fast, and in the last five years we’ve seen great improvement,” Sister Jeanne [Devos] said. Seven Indian states have passed laws bringing domestic workers under the Minimum Wage Act, a small but significant recognition of basic rights. Social security benefits will be available for the first time soon, with the government announcing health insurance coverage for domestic workers and three family members. And Sister Jeanne, like many other activists in this field, hopes that the norms set by the International Labor Organization convention will be accepted by individual Indian states, even if it takes a few years for the central government to ratify the convention.

“One of the more contentious issues for domestic workers in India is the question of workplace safety. A landmark bill in 2010 tackling sexual harassment in the workplace was criticized for omitting domestic workers. The argument of its framers was that it would be difficult to police private homes.

“The task force from the Ministry of Labor is looking into the amendment to the sexual harassment bill,” Sister Jeanne said. “If the home is defined as a private space, then the employer should not take on an outsider as a worker. It starts with the name — domestic worker — it’s an identity. It allows workers to see the dignity of their work, to make comparisons with air hostesses, or to see the value of the work they do, whether this is child care or care for the aged.”

Read the full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/13/world/asia/13iht-letter13.html?_r=2&ref=women

August 1, 2011 at 12:21 pm Leave a comment

“Asia: Heirs and spares”

Indian brideThis article in the Financial Times discusses the social, political, and economic implications of Asia’s “missing women”:

Asia: Heirs and spares

By Amy Kazmin, Patti Waldmeir and Girija Shivakumar

The political, economic and social consequences of a preference for sons is alarming policymakers
 
 In the Indian farming village of Medina, 200km from Delhi, the narrow lanes are clogged with high-end sport utility vehicles, reflecting the prosperity brought by rising land values to this traditional community. In their mud-floored homes, residents display flatscreen televisions, refrigerators and other modern conveniences.

But Medina’s families are also using their new wealth to acquire a scarce local commodity: teenage girls to act as wives for the community’s growing cohorts of unmarried men.

A shortage of young women arising from decades of aggressive use of sex-selective abortion in northern breadbasket states – including Haryana, where Medina is located – is prompting families to turn to the impoverished east to secure females. Communities once fussy about caste are now prepared to buy young girls who do not even speak their language, though such unions are usually without formal weddings. “At first, people were ashamed of bringing wives from outside, but now they don’t care – they pay and they bring,” says Ram Niwas, 68. “A woman is a child-bearing machine. Her only work is to bear children and cook.”

Read the full article: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/54751678-ab1a-11e0-b4d8-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1S0F4Y9yv

July 25, 2011 at 12:13 pm Leave a comment

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