Posts tagged ‘India’

This Taboo-Busting Ad Is Reinventing ‘Happily Ever After’ In India

Widowed and divorced women have historically been shunned in areas of India. So imagine the nation’s surprise when jeweler Tanishq celebrated a second marriage in its new ad.

The spot features a beautiful bride having a playful moment with her daughter after bridesmaids help her adjust her jewelry. At the ceremony, we see the hunky groom struck with love for both his new wife and stepdaughter.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/31/india-second-marriage-ad_n_4181192.html

November 1, 2013 at 10:04 am Leave a comment

Passports to Progress Event feat. Andrea Mitchell, Christy Turlington Burns – March 7

Rude Awakening

The complex epidemic of violence young women and girls face in India and beyond

Join the International Center for Research on Women on the eve of International Women’s Day for its first Passports to Progress event in support of its new campaign, Turning Point: Changing the Course for Adolescent Girls Worldwide. A diverse panel of leading experts in the fields of gender, rights and development will discuss the many ways in which violence against women – especially young women and girls – in non-conflict settings has become a global epidemic.

Moderator:

Andrea Mitchell NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and host of MSNBC’S “Andrea Mitchell Reports”

Panelists:

Michael Elliott, President/CEO of ONE

Christy Turlington Burns, Founder of Every Mother Counts and Director/Producer of “No Woman, No Cry”

Stella Mukasa, Director of Gender Violence and Rights at ICRW

Ravi Verma, Regional Director, Asia at ICRW

With a special video presentation by Kavita Ramdas, Ford Foundation’s Regional Representative in New Delhi.

When: Thursday, March 7, 2013               6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Where: National Press Club 529 14th St. NW, 13th Floor Washington, DC 20045

This event is free to attend, but registration is required.

Register here: http://passports2progress2013.eventbrite.com/#

February 22, 2013 at 10:39 am 1 comment

Be the Change: “Empower Girls Through Football In A Slum In India” @realitygives @YuwaFootball #hwhtw

Reality Gives and YUWA are raising funds for a girls’ football program in the infamous Dharavi slum in Mumbai – the setting of Slumdog Millionaire.  (I visited Reality’s community center and school in Dharavi last year and was impressed with their work.)  Check out this video telling the story of how soccer changed one girl’s life for the better!

Watch the video: 

Learn more and donate to the project: http://www.globalgiving.co.uk/projects/football-for-girls-empowerment/

June 18, 2012 at 5:59 pm 1 comment

HWHTW in the News! @bethmonster @HealthyLiving @USNC_UNWomen #hwhtw

Here at HWHTW, I usually like to write about the news, not appear in it.  But when the delightful Elizabeth Kuster of the Huffington Post asked to interview me about the trip I took to India last summer, I couldn’t say no.  (Especially since it’s for the HuffPost’s “Becoming Fearless” series – flattery will get you everywhere!)  You can read the interview here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/07/grad-student-risks-3500_n_1491711.html?ref=healthy-living

Also, I’m delighted to be a new member of the US National Committee for UN Women’s Board of Directors!  Join us for our Annual Meeting in DC on June 2nd – get all the details here: Save the Date: USNC-UN Women 2012 Annual Meeting

May 7, 2012 at 7:57 pm Leave a comment

Indian Women Leaders Recognized for Accomplishments in Promoting Health @UN_Women #India #hwhtw

Since India’s implementation of quotas in local government, women have put in an impressive performance – bravo!  (See also: “Women as Policy Makers“)

“Puniben Rajpara from Gujarat has improved water facilities in her village, while Shashi Kiran from Himachal Pradesh has demanded one-year maternity leave for working women in her area. At the Women’s Political Empowerment Day Celebrations 2012, they were two of the four outstanding elected women representatives from panchayats (village councils) who were honoured for their efforts to improve health and provide basic social amenities in their villages.”

Read the full article: http://www.unwomen.org/2012/05/elected-women-representatives-in-india-are-awarded-for-their-efforts-to-improve-health/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ungen+%28UN+gender+equality+news+feed%29

May 4, 2012 at 12:28 pm Leave a comment

Ban Ki-moon: “The Best Investment a Country Can Make” @UN #hwhtw #maternalhealth

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recently spoke at a reception for the in support of “Every Woman Every Child”, in Mumbai, India.  He congratulated India on its efforts to eradicate polio, and challenged the crowd to put the same resources toward maternal and child health, calling it a “common sense approach”:

“[W]e share the same conviction that saving women’s and children’s lives is the best investment any country can make.  If a person is ill, or their child is sick, anyone with resources would not think twice about spending them on health care.  But, somehow, Governments often miss this common-sense approach to what matters in life.”

Read the full speech: http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2012/sgsm14261.doc.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ungen+%28UN+gender+equality+news+feed%29

May 3, 2012 at 7:17 pm Leave a comment

Video: “Bunker Roy: Learning from a barefoot movement” via @TED #India #hwhtw

Don’t miss this TEDtalk from a remarkable Indian education innovator.  A HWHTW favorite (see India: Grandmothers electrify rural communities)!

“In Rajasthan, India, an extraordinary school teaches rural women and men — many of them illiterate — to become solar engineers, artisans, dentists and doctors in their own villages. It’s called the Barefoot College, and its founder, Bunker Roy, explains how it works.”

Watch the video: http://www.ted.com/talks/bunker_roy.html

April 30, 2012 at 6:36 pm Leave a comment

Room to Read: “Promoting Literacy. Empowering Girls.” @RoomtoRead #hwhtw

Room to Read works in collaboration with communities and local governments across Asia and Africa to develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children, and support girls to complete secondary school with the life skills they’ll need to succeed in school and beyond.  Room to Read has distributed 10 million books and reached 6 million children so far.

If you’ll be in DC on May 3rd, you can support Room to Read in style at the DC Spring Gala and Dinner!  To learn more about the gala, register, or make a donation even if you can’t attend: http://www.roomtoread.org/document.doc?id=624

And to learn more about Room to Read: http://www.roomtoread.org

April 11, 2012 at 12:09 pm Leave a comment

HWHTW is Global! #hwhtw

WordPress has (finally) started showing info on where our blogs’ readers are coming from, and wow!  All the orange on this map shows that HWHTW is being read all over the world.  HWHTW readers hail from 77 countries – our biggest following is in the U.S., followed by India, the UK, Canada, Australia, and Pakistan.  We’ve also had visitors from Belgium, Brazil, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Botswana, Bahrain… and that’s just the ones that start with “B”!  Welcome, everyone, and thanks for spreading the word about HWHTW!

March 17, 2012 at 12:12 pm Leave a comment

“The Third Billion” #hwhtw

The Third Billion

As growing numbers of women enter the economic mainstream, they will have a profound effect on global business.

by DeAnne Aguirre and Karim Sabbagh

A huge and fast-growing group of people are poised to take their place in the economic mainstream over the next decade, as producers, consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. This group’s impact on the global economy will be at least as significant as that of China and India’s billion-plus populations. But its members have not yet attracted the level of attention they deserve.

If China and India each represent 1 billion emerging participants in the global marketplace, then this “third billion” is made up of women, in both developing and industrialized nations, whose economic lives have previously been stunted, underleveraged, or suppressed…

Read the full article: http://www.strategy-business.com/article/10211?gko=98895

December 5, 2011 at 11:39 am Leave a comment

“Why Are India’s Women So Stressed Out?” @hbr #hwhtw

Does empowering women make them more stressed out?  This Harvard Business Review article by Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Ripa Rashid looks at the data:

“According to “Women of Tomorrow,” a recent Nielsen survey of 6,500 women across 21 different nations, Indian women are the most stressed in the world today. An overwhelming 87% of Indian women said they felt stressed most of the time, and 82% reported that they had no time to relax.

“The Nielsen survey’s respondents blame the difficulty of juggling multiple roles at home and work. Career opportunities for women in “the New India” are rapidly expanding, but family expectations and social mores remain rooted in tradition.”

Read the full article: http://blogs.hbr.org/hbr/hewlett/2011/08/why_are_indias_women_so_stress.html

September 23, 2011 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

Inside Teach for India

For the next two years, Devanik Saha will be teaching at a government-run school for low-income girls in India as part of the Teach for India program.  His blog post for the Women’s Worldwide Web recounts some of the challenges and successes of his first few days on the job.  A few excerpts:

“I packed myself into an auto-rickshaw and pressed myself against other passengers for the jerkiest, most painful ride to school of my life—I kept telling myself, “This is nothing. I am here for the kids whose lives I want to transform for the better.’  Arriving enthusiastically at the school, I waited for all my students to arrive. After 15 to 20 minutes, only six girls out of a class of thirty had turned up.”

“What has struck me is how much more there is to teaching than formal teaching activities; it’s not just about instructing pupils in academic subjects like maths and English. I try to be as supportive as possible of the children and their families as they deal with certain sensitive issues—such as family and community problems and their difficult financial circumstances. I have tried to embrace these challenges with love and care. By developing relationships with the parents, listening to their hopes, frustrations, aspirations, and feelings of helplessness, I hope I will be more effective in my efforts to teach their children and to create a culture in which the children are encouraged to learn.”

“The principal and school administration investigated and were indignant when they learned that the pupils had indeed been deprived of their lunch. We agreed that I could be responsible for supervising the lunch distribution, ensuring that the lunch was distributed fairly and allowing the school helpers to keep any remaining leftovers for their families. I was also pleasantly surprised when a van arrived at the school an hour later to unload two large containers of food for my class!”

Read the full article: http://www.womensworldwideweb.org/?q=Devanik%20Teach%20for%20India%201

August 23, 2011 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

“In India, Maids Need Protection and Respect”

Sister Jeanne DevosDomestic workers face serious workplace dangers:  human trafficking, underpayment, beatings, sexual exploitation, and forcible confinement.  The International Labor Organization’s Convention on Domestic Workers was approved by over 100 countries, including India, in June, and India’s domestic workers are hopeful that it will mean an improvement in their working conditions.

From the New York Times:

“The situation is changing rather fast, and in the last five years we’ve seen great improvement,” Sister Jeanne [Devos] said. Seven Indian states have passed laws bringing domestic workers under the Minimum Wage Act, a small but significant recognition of basic rights. Social security benefits will be available for the first time soon, with the government announcing health insurance coverage for domestic workers and three family members. And Sister Jeanne, like many other activists in this field, hopes that the norms set by the International Labor Organization convention will be accepted by individual Indian states, even if it takes a few years for the central government to ratify the convention.

“One of the more contentious issues for domestic workers in India is the question of workplace safety. A landmark bill in 2010 tackling sexual harassment in the workplace was criticized for omitting domestic workers. The argument of its framers was that it would be difficult to police private homes.

“The task force from the Ministry of Labor is looking into the amendment to the sexual harassment bill,” Sister Jeanne said. “If the home is defined as a private space, then the employer should not take on an outsider as a worker. It starts with the name — domestic worker — it’s an identity. It allows workers to see the dignity of their work, to make comparisons with air hostesses, or to see the value of the work they do, whether this is child care or care for the aged.”

Read the full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/13/world/asia/13iht-letter13.html?_r=2&ref=women

August 1, 2011 at 12:21 pm Leave a comment

“Asia: Heirs and spares”

Indian brideThis article in the Financial Times discusses the social, political, and economic implications of Asia’s “missing women”:

Asia: Heirs and spares

By Amy Kazmin, Patti Waldmeir and Girija Shivakumar

The political, economic and social consequences of a preference for sons is alarming policymakers
 
 In the Indian farming village of Medina, 200km from Delhi, the narrow lanes are clogged with high-end sport utility vehicles, reflecting the prosperity brought by rising land values to this traditional community. In their mud-floored homes, residents display flatscreen televisions, refrigerators and other modern conveniences.

But Medina’s families are also using their new wealth to acquire a scarce local commodity: teenage girls to act as wives for the community’s growing cohorts of unmarried men.

A shortage of young women arising from decades of aggressive use of sex-selective abortion in northern breadbasket states – including Haryana, where Medina is located – is prompting families to turn to the impoverished east to secure females. Communities once fussy about caste are now prepared to buy young girls who do not even speak their language, though such unions are usually without formal weddings. “At first, people were ashamed of bringing wives from outside, but now they don’t care – they pay and they bring,” says Ram Niwas, 68. “A woman is a child-bearing machine. Her only work is to bear children and cook.”

Read the full article: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/54751678-ab1a-11e0-b4d8-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz1S0F4Y9yv

July 25, 2011 at 12:13 pm Leave a comment

Be the Change: The Be in Their Shoes Project

Marcel Tavelini and Emilia Galiano are spending two months in India working with the Mann Deshi Foundation:

“Mann Deshi Bank, active in six different locations across Maharashtra, is a pioneer in the microcredit field in India and mainly focuses on women empowerment. It’s sister organization, the Mann Deshi Foundation is responsible for several programs concerning women’s literacy and non-financial support. This organization believes in the adoption of a holistic approach: on the one hand they provide financial services to poor women, making them economically independent, on the other hand they provide training, mentorship and support, so as to make women self-confident.”
 
On arrival, they realized that the children in the area had unsuitable or no shoes to play sports in, so they launched the Be in Their Shoes (BITS) project to raise money for shoes.  BITS has 3 weeks to raise $5,500 – and Marcel and Emilia have promised to commemorate reaching their fundraising milestones with funny photos and videos! 
 
Click here to donate or learn more: http://beintheirshoes.blogspot.com/p/why-donate.html

July 23, 2011 at 12:04 pm Leave a comment

Coming Soon: Book Reviews

This week I attended a fascinating Asia Society event entitled “The Indian Woman: From Myth to Modernity.”  It featured a distinguished panel of brilliant and talented Indian women, and after hearing them read and speak about their work, I had to jump online to order three of their books.  Stay tuned for reviews, coming soon:

In Search of Sita: Revisiting Mythology by Namita Gokhale and Malashri Lal
Pomegranate dreams & other stories by Vijay Lakshmi (short stories)
Confluences: Indian Women, Indian Goddesses by Nishi Chawla (poetry)

July 2, 2011 at 12:50 pm 1 comment

Development: Gender Matters

This article from the journal Gender, Technology and Development provides a striking illustration of the importance of understanding gender relationships when designing development programs.  “Empowerment and Disempowerment of Forest Women in Uttarakhand, India” examines the community impacts of a World Bank-funded forestry project.  “Instead of increasing women’s empowerment, the top-down interventions… are doing the opposite by disrupting and marginalizing their own struggles and achievements, transferring power and authority to the forest department and local elite men,” the author notes.

Read more: http://gtd.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/5/3/341

 

 

 

 

June 1, 2011 at 10:54 am Leave a comment

Ela R. Bhatt: “Empowering Women to Forge Their Own Futures”

The Ford Foundation recently announced the winners of its Visionaries Awards, awarded to “12 social innovators who, through their extraordinary vision and courageous work, are improving the lives of millions of people.”  Among the recipients was Indian women’s empowerment pioneer Ela R. Bhatt:

Empowering Women to Forge Their Own Futures

Ela R. Bhatt

Ela R. Bhatt
Founder & CEO, Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA)
Ahmedabad, India

“Widely recognized as one of the world’s most remarkable entrepreneurial forces in grassroots development, Ela R. Bhatt has dedicated her life to improving the lives of India’s poorest and most oppressed women workers. A former parliamentarian, she founded the Self-Employed Women’s Association—a trade union for poor, self-employed female workers in India with more than 1 million members. Bhatt also founded Sa-Dhan (the All-India Association of Micro-finance Institutions) and the Indian School of Micro-finance for Women, which together have created new financial opportunities for millions of women across India.”

Read more about SEWA: http://www.sewa.org/

Read more about the other Visionaries Award winners: http://www.fordfoundation.org/newsroom/news-from-ford/480

May 11, 2011 at 2:35 pm Leave a comment

“In South Asia, Women are WISER”

Check out this post from sister blog SHEenergy:

In South Asia, Women are WISER

“The Women’s Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER), based in Kerala, India, is ‘promoting the active participation and leadership of women in the energy sector’ in South Asia.”

Read more: http://sheenergy.wordpress.com/2011/05/02/in-south-asia-women-are-wiser/

May 2, 2011 at 2:02 pm

Nest: More than Microfinance, More than Fair Trade

“Nest is a nonprofit organization that empowers female artists and artisans around the world. Using a unique combination of interest-free microfinance loans, mentoring from established designers, as well as a market in which to sell their crafts, Nest helps its loan recipients create successful small businesses. Nest instills pride of ownership, preserves ancient artistic traditions and successfully moves women from poverty to self-sufficiency.”

Shop their fun, distinctive, handmade offerings at http://www.buildanest.com!

A few favorites:

Hayat tote: http://www.buildanest.com/product.asp?productid=2431

Temple Beads by Lolita: http://www.buildanest.com/product.asp?productid=2101

TranquiliT savasana throw: http://www.buildanest.com/product.asp?productid=1599&group=aha

 

Nest is a 2011 Tranquil Space Foundation grant recipient!

April 20, 2011 at 12:12 pm Leave a comment

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