Posts tagged ‘education’

Room to Read: “Promoting Literacy. Empowering Girls.” @RoomtoRead #hwhtw

Room to Read works in collaboration with communities and local governments across Asia and Africa to develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children, and support girls to complete secondary school with the life skills they’ll need to succeed in school and beyond.  Room to Read has distributed 10 million books and reached 6 million children so far.

If you’ll be in DC on May 3rd, you can support Room to Read in style at the DC Spring Gala and Dinner!  To learn more about the gala, register, or make a donation even if you can’t attend: http://www.roomtoread.org/document.doc?id=624

And to learn more about Room to Read: http://www.roomtoread.org

April 11, 2012 at 12:09 pm Leave a comment

Event: “Arranged” Film Screening and Discussion

 

The event will be held in the SAIS Rome Building, at 1619 Massachusetts Ave NW, in Washington DC.

March 31, 2012 at 12:44 pm Leave a comment

New “Voices of Women” Class at American University, May 7-23! @HannaRosin #hwhtw

When I first met Hanna Rosin, she had just finished telling the TEDWomen audience that “Men are the new ball and chain.”  My post about that talk (and her famous article in the Atlantic Monthly entitled “The End of Men”) was the most-viewed post on this blog in 2011!  There’s no doubt that Hanna knows how to keep things interesting.

Now, she’s taking her talents to the classroom.  This May, Hanna will be  teaching a 3-week class on “Voices of Women” along with American University professor Iris Krasnow.  Knowing Hanna, there won’t be a dull moment…

To learn more or enroll in the class: http://www.american.edu/washingtonsemester/women/Enroll-Now.cfm

 

 

March 3, 2012 at 12:16 pm Leave a comment

Japan: “Land of the wasted talent” @TheEconomist #hwhtw

This article from the Economist shows that the developing world isn’t the only place where women’s talents are underutilized…

“Nearly half of Japanese university graduates are female but only 67% of these women have jobs, many of which are part-time or involve serving tea. Japanese women with degrees are much more likely than Americans (74% to 31%) to quit their jobs voluntarily. Whereas most Western women who take time off do so to look after children, Japanese women are more likely to say that the strongest push came from employers who do not value them. A startling 49% of highly educated Japanese women who quit do so because they feel their careers have stalled.”

Read the full article: http://www.economist.com/node/21536543

November 18, 2011 at 12:35 pm Leave a comment

To Beat Poverty, Invest in Women: Some Stats #hwhtw

Thanks to World Pulse for sharing some interesting statistics on the state of women and girls in the world:

  • When women and girls earn income, they reinvest 90 percent of it into their families, as compared to only 30 to 40 percent for a man.
  • Out of the world’s 130 million out-of-school youth, 70 percent are girls.
  • Approximately one-quarter of girls in developing countries are not in school.
  • One-quarter to one-half of girls in developing countries become mothers before age 18; 14 million girls aged 15 to 19 give birth in developing countries each year.

Read the full article: http://www.worldpulse.com/node/45592

October 27, 2011 at 1:30 pm Leave a comment

Inside Teach for India

For the next two years, Devanik Saha will be teaching at a government-run school for low-income girls in India as part of the Teach for India program.  His blog post for the Women’s Worldwide Web recounts some of the challenges and successes of his first few days on the job.  A few excerpts:

“I packed myself into an auto-rickshaw and pressed myself against other passengers for the jerkiest, most painful ride to school of my life—I kept telling myself, “This is nothing. I am here for the kids whose lives I want to transform for the better.’  Arriving enthusiastically at the school, I waited for all my students to arrive. After 15 to 20 minutes, only six girls out of a class of thirty had turned up.”

“What has struck me is how much more there is to teaching than formal teaching activities; it’s not just about instructing pupils in academic subjects like maths and English. I try to be as supportive as possible of the children and their families as they deal with certain sensitive issues—such as family and community problems and their difficult financial circumstances. I have tried to embrace these challenges with love and care. By developing relationships with the parents, listening to their hopes, frustrations, aspirations, and feelings of helplessness, I hope I will be more effective in my efforts to teach their children and to create a culture in which the children are encouraged to learn.”

“The principal and school administration investigated and were indignant when they learned that the pupils had indeed been deprived of their lunch. We agreed that I could be responsible for supervising the lunch distribution, ensuring that the lunch was distributed fairly and allowing the school helpers to keep any remaining leftovers for their families. I was also pleasantly surprised when a van arrived at the school an hour later to unload two large containers of food for my class!”

Read the full article: http://www.womensworldwideweb.org/?q=Devanik%20Teach%20for%20India%201

August 23, 2011 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

#DTDW: Highlights, Part 1

Here are some of my favorite quotes from the Democracy that Delivers for Women Conference:

David Chavern: “Business is the answer, not the problem.”

David Chavern: “Countries that treat women badly, do badly.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Women make sure there’s a community to go back to when the war is over.”

Gayle Lemmon: “In tough parts of the world, women turn to business to make sure their children get fed.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Unsung heroines and aspiring entrepreneurs are all around us.”

Mary Schnack: “Women don’t need to be sitting on a dirt floor to need help growing their businesses.”

Mary Schnack: “We need to help women recognize themselves as leaders and be honored as leaders”

Gayle Lemmon: “Afghan women are desperate for peace, but afraid it will come at the price of their right to go to work and school.”

More to come!

June 23, 2011 at 12:18 pm Leave a comment

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