Posts tagged ‘education’

Girl Rising: Sign Up for a Screening!

girl risingTickets are available now for screenings of the new film Girl Rising! According to PureWow,

Girl Rising [is] a documentary-narrative hybrid about nine extraordinary girls from around the world–and the opportunities afforded them by education. The filmic equivalent of a short-story collection, each segment stars a real girl acting out an episode from her own life.

“The scripts were written by novelists from the girls’ home countries (Cambodia, Afghanistan, Peru and more) and then narrated by actresses like Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway and Kerry Washington. The most affecting story, for instance, was written by Haiti’s Edwidge Danticat, read by Cate Blanchett and stars an infectiously adorable child who refuses to give up on schooling in post-earthquake Port-au-Prince.”

Find a screening near you: http://girlrising.com/see-the-film/

March 14, 2013 at 12:04 pm Leave a comment

UNICEF Turns Pinterest’s Consumer Focus On Its Head

THE (INTENTIONALLY) SADDEST PINTEREST PAGE IN THE WORLD

BY: JOE BERKOWITZ

UNICEF creates a page for Ami Musa, a young girl from Sierra Leone, to bring her “pinnable” interests and ours into sharp relief…

UNICEF has turned that naked consumerism on its head with a Pinterest board that showcases a human being’s most basic wants.

The world humanitarian organization and agency Weapon 7 recently created a page on Pinterest that ostensibly reflects the wishes and hopes of 13-year old Sierra Leona resident, Ami Musa. While that concept may sound like The Onion-style satire, in execution it’s anything but. While lots of Pinterest pages are chockablock with decorating ideas, wardrobe aspirations, and fantasy meals to cook, young Ami’s reminds us that for some people, running water alone would be a dream come true. Pinterest users can repin her posts and click on any of them to donate.

Read the full article here: http://www.fastcocreate.com/1681565/the-intentionally-saddest-pinterest-page-in-the-world

Follow Ami’s Pinterest board here: http://pinterest.com/AmiMusa/

September 19, 2012 at 12:06 pm Leave a comment

Infographic: “The Revolution will be led by a 12-year-old girl” @Womens_eNews @VitalVoices @Pinterest

Found on Pinterest thanks to Vital Voices and Women’s eNews!

August 16, 2012 at 1:04 pm 1 comment

Counterpoint: “Saudi women going to Games is a sham” @SAISHopkins #olympics #hwhtw

Much has been made (including by HWHTW – see: News: “Saudi Arabia To Send Olympic Women Athletes For First Time”) of the gender  milestones reached with the 2012 Olympics: more women athletes than men, and  female participants from every participating country, including Saudi Arabia.  Jocelyne Cesari, a professor at Johns Hopkins SAIS, argues that the presence of female Saudi athletes at the Olympics does not signify a big step forward for Saudi women:

“But if [judo competitor Wojdan] Shaherkani had withdrawn, it would not have been a setback for Saudi women because her inclusion was not a sign of advancement. The presence of Saudi women is the result of several months of pressure by the International Olympics Committee on Saudi Arabia to include women competitors or face being banned from participation.

“The situation for female athletes in Saudi Arabia is bleak.

“Saudi women in general are denied the right to practice sports. Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world that prevents girls from taking part in sports in government schools. Physical education is allowed only in private schools. Women are not allowed to play in official sports clubs or even watch matches in stadiums. Girls’ football, volleyball and basketball games in private schools and colleges are held secretly.”

Read the full article: http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/01/opinion/cesari-saudi-women-sports/index.html

August 1, 2012 at 12:57 pm 1 comment

“Roominate: Make It Yours!” @Kickstarter @RoominateToy #STEM #hwhtw

Fantastic Kickstarter idea: a toy that gets girls excited about engineering, math, and science!

“Roominate is a kit of wooden building pieces and circuit components with which a child can use her creativity to design, build, wire, and decorate her own unique interactive room.

“AND, the rooms are attachable and stackable, enabling girls to build and design expandable structures. The pieces are made to be simple and intuitive so as to allow a girl to explore and discover on her own.”

Read more: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/369073015/roominate-make-it-yours

May 21, 2012 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

“The United Arab Emirates – a Fertile Frontier for Financial Women” via @VitalVoices @HuffingtonPost #hwhtw

Anne Izzillo of the HuffPost reports that the UAE is the place to be for women entrepreneurs:

“This is what we found: If you are a woman looking to start a business in the UAE — this is your moment. Today, women are forming start-ups in the region that range from multi-million dollar private equity funds and tech start-ups to western-inspired fashion labels and successful yoga studio chains. The opportunities are ripe for local and foreign women alike, thanks to several key factors that are leading a female business boom in the region.

“It starts with the government’s commitment to providing a high standard of education for both men and women. Today, the literacy rate for UAE women is 90 percent. Also, it is encouraging that the UAE Constitution promotes gender equality, including equal pay for equal work under the Labor Law and the right for women to inherit property. All of these factors have created a fertile environment for the seeds of female entrepreneurship to grow.”

Read the full article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anne-izzillo/united-arab-emirates_b_1522362.html

May 18, 2012 at 12:08 pm Leave a comment

Video: “Bunker Roy: Learning from a barefoot movement” via @TED #India #hwhtw

Don’t miss this TEDtalk from a remarkable Indian education innovator.  A HWHTW favorite (see India: Grandmothers electrify rural communities)!

“In Rajasthan, India, an extraordinary school teaches rural women and men — many of them illiterate — to become solar engineers, artisans, dentists and doctors in their own villages. It’s called the Barefoot College, and its founder, Bunker Roy, explains how it works.”

Watch the video: http://www.ted.com/talks/bunker_roy.html

April 30, 2012 at 6:36 pm Leave a comment

Room to Read: “Promoting Literacy. Empowering Girls.” @RoomtoRead #hwhtw

Room to Read works in collaboration with communities and local governments across Asia and Africa to develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children, and support girls to complete secondary school with the life skills they’ll need to succeed in school and beyond.  Room to Read has distributed 10 million books and reached 6 million children so far.

If you’ll be in DC on May 3rd, you can support Room to Read in style at the DC Spring Gala and Dinner!  To learn more about the gala, register, or make a donation even if you can’t attend: http://www.roomtoread.org/document.doc?id=624

And to learn more about Room to Read: http://www.roomtoread.org

April 11, 2012 at 12:09 pm Leave a comment

Event: “Arranged” Film Screening and Discussion

 

The event will be held in the SAIS Rome Building, at 1619 Massachusetts Ave NW, in Washington DC.

March 31, 2012 at 12:44 pm Leave a comment

New “Voices of Women” Class at American University, May 7-23! @HannaRosin #hwhtw

When I first met Hanna Rosin, she had just finished telling the TEDWomen audience that “Men are the new ball and chain.”  My post about that talk (and her famous article in the Atlantic Monthly entitled “The End of Men”) was the most-viewed post on this blog in 2011!  There’s no doubt that Hanna knows how to keep things interesting.

Now, she’s taking her talents to the classroom.  This May, Hanna will be  teaching a 3-week class on “Voices of Women” along with American University professor Iris Krasnow.  Knowing Hanna, there won’t be a dull moment…

To learn more or enroll in the class: http://www.american.edu/washingtonsemester/women/Enroll-Now.cfm

 

 

March 3, 2012 at 12:16 pm Leave a comment

Japan: “Land of the wasted talent” @TheEconomist #hwhtw

This article from the Economist shows that the developing world isn’t the only place where women’s talents are underutilized…

“Nearly half of Japanese university graduates are female but only 67% of these women have jobs, many of which are part-time or involve serving tea. Japanese women with degrees are much more likely than Americans (74% to 31%) to quit their jobs voluntarily. Whereas most Western women who take time off do so to look after children, Japanese women are more likely to say that the strongest push came from employers who do not value them. A startling 49% of highly educated Japanese women who quit do so because they feel their careers have stalled.”

Read the full article: http://www.economist.com/node/21536543

November 18, 2011 at 12:35 pm Leave a comment

To Beat Poverty, Invest in Women: Some Stats #hwhtw

Thanks to World Pulse for sharing some interesting statistics on the state of women and girls in the world:

  • When women and girls earn income, they reinvest 90 percent of it into their families, as compared to only 30 to 40 percent for a man.
  • Out of the world’s 130 million out-of-school youth, 70 percent are girls.
  • Approximately one-quarter of girls in developing countries are not in school.
  • One-quarter to one-half of girls in developing countries become mothers before age 18; 14 million girls aged 15 to 19 give birth in developing countries each year.

Read the full article: http://www.worldpulse.com/node/45592

October 27, 2011 at 1:30 pm Leave a comment

Inside Teach for India

For the next two years, Devanik Saha will be teaching at a government-run school for low-income girls in India as part of the Teach for India program.  His blog post for the Women’s Worldwide Web recounts some of the challenges and successes of his first few days on the job.  A few excerpts:

“I packed myself into an auto-rickshaw and pressed myself against other passengers for the jerkiest, most painful ride to school of my life—I kept telling myself, “This is nothing. I am here for the kids whose lives I want to transform for the better.’  Arriving enthusiastically at the school, I waited for all my students to arrive. After 15 to 20 minutes, only six girls out of a class of thirty had turned up.”

“What has struck me is how much more there is to teaching than formal teaching activities; it’s not just about instructing pupils in academic subjects like maths and English. I try to be as supportive as possible of the children and their families as they deal with certain sensitive issues—such as family and community problems and their difficult financial circumstances. I have tried to embrace these challenges with love and care. By developing relationships with the parents, listening to their hopes, frustrations, aspirations, and feelings of helplessness, I hope I will be more effective in my efforts to teach their children and to create a culture in which the children are encouraged to learn.”

“The principal and school administration investigated and were indignant when they learned that the pupils had indeed been deprived of their lunch. We agreed that I could be responsible for supervising the lunch distribution, ensuring that the lunch was distributed fairly and allowing the school helpers to keep any remaining leftovers for their families. I was also pleasantly surprised when a van arrived at the school an hour later to unload two large containers of food for my class!”

Read the full article: http://www.womensworldwideweb.org/?q=Devanik%20Teach%20for%20India%201

August 23, 2011 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

#DTDW: Highlights, Part 1

Here are some of my favorite quotes from the Democracy that Delivers for Women Conference:

David Chavern: “Business is the answer, not the problem.”

David Chavern: “Countries that treat women badly, do badly.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Women make sure there’s a community to go back to when the war is over.”

Gayle Lemmon: “In tough parts of the world, women turn to business to make sure their children get fed.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Unsung heroines and aspiring entrepreneurs are all around us.”

Mary Schnack: “Women don’t need to be sitting on a dirt floor to need help growing their businesses.”

Mary Schnack: “We need to help women recognize themselves as leaders and be honored as leaders”

Gayle Lemmon: “Afghan women are desperate for peace, but afraid it will come at the price of their right to go to work and school.”

More to come!

June 23, 2011 at 12:18 pm Leave a comment

Facing Servitude, Ethiopian Girls Run for a Better Life

Another great find from Nicole Epps!

Facing Servitude, Ethiopian Girls Run for a Better Life
by Emily Wax

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Virtually the only way for Tesdale Mesele, 13, to avoid soon being married into a life of housework and childbearing was to run.

So that’s what the spunky girl with matchstick legs and a ponytail did. She ran along the rutted dirt roads of the Ethiopian highlands, barefoot or in torn sneakers, trying to improve her endurance. She ran up the wide, cracked steps to Meskel Square in the capital, while goats wandered by and clouds of pollution turned the air charcoal gray.

Read the full article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/28/AR2005122801369.html?referrer=facebook

April 14, 2011 at 12:51 pm 1 comment

ADB Gender Equality Results Case Study: Bhutan

A new study from the Asian Development Bank assesses the gender-equality impact of four ADB-sponsored projects in the Himalayan nation of Bhutan: the Micro, Small, and Medium-Sized Enterprise Sector Development Program, the Rural Electricians Training Program, the Basic Skills Development Project and Rural Skills Development Project, and the Improving the Well-Being of Road Workers Project.  The report notes how each program affected and was influenced by women, and the steps taken to ensure the programs served women’s  needs.  Strategies ranged from increasing women’s access to finance to ensuring equal pay for women electricians’ work. 

Bravo to the ADB for going to the effort to make sure their programs benefit all people, regardless of gender!

Read the report: http://www.adb.org/documents/reports/gender/case-studies-bhu/gender-case-study-bhu.pdf

April 8, 2011 at 12:13 pm 1 comment

Webcast: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Author and Activist for Women in Muslim Societies

Today at 8:00 pm (Eastern time), author and activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali will speak at Johns Hopkins University on “Global Citizenship: Reexamining the Role of the Individual in an Evolving World.”

“Ayaan Hirsi Ali is one of the foremost advocates for the rights of women in Muslim societies. She has won praise and sparked controversy for her stances on the Prophet Muhammad, Sharia law, and the punishments given for homosexuality and adultery. Her autobiographical books Infidel and Nomad: From Islam to America: A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations have been released to worldwide acclaim. The New Yorker praised Infidel for being “a profoundly moving memoir that celebrates triumph over adversity.” In 2005, Time Magazine named her one of the 100 Most Influential Persons of the World. In 2007, Ms. Hirsi Ali founded a nonprofit organization, the AHA Foundation, which aids in the defense and protection of women’s rights against fundamentalist Islam.  She is also a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a non-partisan think tank in Washington, D.C. Ms Hirsi Ali has received several awards, including a free speech award from the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, the Swedish Liberal Party’s Democracy Prize, and the Moral Courage Award in 2006 for her commitment to conflict resolution and world citizenship.”

Watch the webcast: http://webcast.jhu.edu/mediasite/SilverlightPlayer/Default.aspx?peid=6ac48ad722de410283159b4c8f01affe

(Note: you can still watch the recorded webcast if you missed it live!)

April 5, 2011 at 5:02 pm Leave a comment

Expanding Access to Finance for Health e-Conference: March 29-30

Next Tuesday and Wednesday, the World Bank, International Finance Corporation, and the USAID Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector project (SHOPS) are hosting an online conference on “the use of financial services to strengthen the global health care supply chain”.  

SHOPS is a five-year cooperative agreement focusing on “increasing availability, improving quality, and expanding coverage of essential health products and services in family planning and reproductive health, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and other health areas through the private sector.”

Join participants from Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, France, Georgia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar,  Nepal, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, the Philippines, South Africa, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uganda, the UK, the US, and Zambia (and that’s just who’s signed up so far) in learning about finance in healthcare!

To register for the online conference or learn more: http://www.shopsproject.org/about/announcements/expanding-access-finance-health-e-conference-0?tr=y&auid=8016972

March 25, 2011 at 12:41 pm Leave a comment

Hanna Rosin: “Men are the new ball and chain”

Hanna Rosin knows how to court controversy.  She is most (in)famous for her article in the Atlantic Monthly entitled “The End of Men.”  In her TED Talk, she pointed out that women are getting college degrees and Ph.D.s at a faster rate than men, that across America young women are outearning young men, and that the female college students in she interviewed in Kansas envisioned their own future roles as breadwinners with stay-at-home husbands (the source of the “ball-and-chain” comment).  In a nutshell, she says, “the global economy is shifting to make women more successful.”  And, she notes, changes this profound “don’t happen without pain.”

Hanna challenged the crowd to envision not a “glass ceiling” to be shattered but a “high bridge” – scary, but a place where we can all go together.  Men and women.  Doesn’t seem so controversial after all.

More on Hanna Rosin: http://www.doublex.com/users/hanna-rosin

December 7, 2010 at 4:37 pm 4 comments

The Girls of Shanti Bhavan

“Shanti Bhavan is a home and an exceptional school for economically and socially disadvantaged children. It is located near the village of Baliganapalli in rural Tamil Nadu, one hour outside of Bangalore.

The mission of Shanti Bhavan is unique and ambitious – to develop children of deprived backgrounds into leaders of society through excellence in education and their holistic personal development.

The success of our model is evident in the academic achievements of our students. The two most senior classes performed exceptionally well in the 10th Grade ICSE exams, with 100% of the students passing with First Division scores, and 50% of each class scoring higher Distinctions.”

This video is a students’ project!  Amazing work!

Learn more about Shanti Bhavan: http://www.shantibhavanonline.org.

November 20, 2010 at 10:17 am Leave a comment


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