Posts tagged ‘book review’

Another great book review from Leah at Impower You!

Individual Empowerment

I admit when I first picked this up, I thought it would end up being a boring story. Royalty holds no interest for me. I was never that girl that played pretend princess and while I did enjoy Snow White and Cinderella, the stories weren’t that great since the girls hardly had any real adventure.  So once again my idea of what a book would be like was shattered and I am happy for that. King Peggy, is now one of my favorite books.

Peggy  is a secretary at the Ghana Embassy in D.C. who finds out she has been chosen as the new king of her village in Otuam, Ghana(Africa).  While this may sound like Cinderella, it is far from it. She is not some poor girl with low self esteem scrubbing floors and holding her tongue.  She is a hardworking woman who has loved, lost, moved to…

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May 22, 2012 at 1:54 pm 1 comment

Coming Soon: Book Reviews

This week I attended a fascinating Asia Society event entitled “The Indian Woman: From Myth to Modernity.”  It featured a distinguished panel of brilliant and talented Indian women, and after hearing them read and speak about their work, I had to jump online to order three of their books.  Stay tuned for reviews, coming soon:

In Search of Sita: Revisiting Mythology by Namita Gokhale and Malashri Lal
Pomegranate dreams & other stories by Vijay Lakshmi (short stories)
Confluences: Indian Women, Indian Goddesses by Nishi Chawla (poetry)

July 2, 2011 at 12:50 pm 1 comment

“Julia Alvarez Illuminates Our Competing Truths”

This Ms. Magazine blog post describes women’s “competing truths” revealed in the poems of Julia Alvarez:

“The feeling of un-belonging or “between-ness”–in gender, country, language, family–is one that unites many of us who experience a certain ambivalence in our identities as citizens, daughters, artists and women. For Julia Alvarez, the award-winning poet and author of bestselling novels such as How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies, the job of the storyteller is to enumerate the multiple competing truths and paradoxes that emerge from this experience of exile or displacement. Or to, in her words, “tell the truth, ‘manifold and one’”

Read the full post: http://msmagazine.com/blog/blog/2011/04/18/how-julia-alvarezs-poetry-illuminates-our-competing-truths/

April 22, 2011 at 12:27 pm Leave a comment

Book Review: Do It Anyway

Courtney E. Martin spoke at TEDWomen about a generation overwhelmed by their mission to change the world.  Her new book, Do It Anyway, offers the stories of eight young people who find a way to make a difference in spite of their bewilderment.  From Rachel, who stood in front of bulldozers in Gaza, to Rosario, the Hollywood actress who struggles to choose the best way to use her celebrity to help others, these young men and women aren’t perfect, but they’re trying.

Learn more: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0807000477?ie=UTF8&tag=helwomhelthew-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0807000477

December 18, 2010 at 9:41 am Leave a comment

Book Review: Behind the Burqa

behind the burqaDaring escapes.  Desperate gun battles.  Devious double-crosses.  You could be forgiven for mistaking Behind the Burqa  for the script from an action thriller movie!  The difference is that the two audacious, courageous women referred to as “Sulima” and “Hala” actually lived these adventures – and their destiny was not assured to be a Hollywood happy ending.  The tale of Sulima and Hala’s lives brings into sharp detail the nearly incomprehensible repression and violence that many women have faced – both living in and escaping from Afghanistan.  But it is also a tale of love, hope, compassion, and persistence against all odds.  Most of all, Behind the Burqa inspires.  Whether you’re bold and brazen like Sulima, or, like gentle Hala, simply unwilling to give up, their stories will call you to action.  It’s a must-read.

Here’s a place to start.  If, like me, you’re appalled by the way Hala was treated by U.S. Immigration, check out the Tahirih Justice Center.  Tahirih provides pro bono legal, educational, and other services to immigrant women and girls seeking justice in the United States from gender-based violence.  http://www.tahirih.org/

June 27, 2010 at 9:06 am 1 comment

Coming Soon: Behind the Burqa Book Review

behind the burqa

Right now I’m reading the hard-hitting, eye-opening, and inspiring Behind the Burqa, the true story of two women’s escape from repression and violence in Afghanistan. Stay tuned for a review soon!

June 7, 2010 at 11:56 am 1 comment


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