Posts tagged ‘Arab Spring’

News: “Egypt’s Mursi to Appoint Deputies Including Woman, Christian” via @BloombergNews #hwhtw #Egypt

A hopeful step forward for Egypt…

Egypt’s Mursi To Name Deputies Including Woman, Christian

By Tarek El-Tablawy – Jun 27, 2012 11:18 AM ET

Egypt’s Islamist president-elect plans to name a woman and a Christian among his deputies, as he seeks to form an administration to heal the rifts that polarized the country after last year’s revolt.

Mohamed Mursi, who won a presidential runoff vote on June 24, will appoint as many as five vice presidents “including a Copt, a woman and a member of the youth” activists, his spokesman, Yasser Ali, said by phone today.

Read the full article: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-27/egypt-s-mursi-to-name-deputies-including-woman-christian.html

June 27, 2012 at 11:45 am Leave a comment

“Why Women Are a Foreign Policy Issue” @mverveer #hwhtw

U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer has penned a brilliant and compelling piece on women for Foreign Policy.  A must-read!

Why Women Are a Foreign Policy Issue

The most pressing global problems simply won’t be solved without the participation of women. Seriously, guys.

On a trip to Afghanistan in the summer of 2009, not long after my appointment as the U.S. State Department’s ambassador at large for global women’s issues, I stopped for dinner with a group of Afghan women activists in Kabul. One woman opened our conversation with a plea: “Please don’t see us as victims, but look to us as the leaders we are.”

Those words have stuck with me as President Barack Obama’s administration has endeavored to put women at the heart of its foreign policy. For generations, the United States too often viewed the world’s women as victims of poverty and illiteracy, of violence and seemingly unbreakable cultural traditions — essentially, as beneficiaries of aid. Women’s issues existed on the margins, segregated from the more “strategic” issues of war, peace, and economic stability. Now, in a time of transformative change — from the rise of new economic powers to a growing chorus of voices against repressive regimes in the Arab world — promoting the status of women is not just a moral imperative but a strategic one; it’s essential to economic prosperity and to global peace and security. It is, in other words, a strategy for a smarter foreign policy.

Read the full article: http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/04/23/why_women_are_a_foreign_policy_issue

April 28, 2012 at 12:05 pm 2 comments

HWHTW at TEDxSummit

Dalia Mogahed reminds us that “30 percent of those who braved the tanks in the Arab Spring were women.”

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April 19, 2012 at 12:06 pm 1 comment

“Yemeni women burn traditional female veils to protest regime crackdown” #arabspring #hwhtw

Women in Yemen are making their voices heard, through dramatic protests aginst the brutal government crackdown.

“In the capital, Sanaa, the women spread a black cloth across a main street and threw their full-body veils, known as makrama, onto a pile, sprayed it with oil and set it ablaze. As the flames rose, they chanted: ‘Who protects Yemeni women from the crimes of the thugs?’

“The women in Yemen have taken a key role in the uprising against President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s authoritarian rule that erupted in March, inspired by other Arab revolutions. Their role came into the limelight earlier in October, when Yemeni woman activist Tawakkul Karman was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, along with two Liberian women, for their struggle for women’s rights.”

Read the full article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/yemeni-women-burn-traditional-face-body-veils-to-protest-government-crackdown-on-protesters/2011/10/26/gIQAllQQIM_story.html

November 6, 2011 at 12:40 pm Leave a comment

“Female war reporters: ‘We’re given the softer side of war'”

This article from The Independent asks, “[I]s it patronising, irrelevant, sexist even, to mention Crawford, Sidner and Khodr’s gender? Or can the fact that three women were at the forefront of media coverage of a revolution be worthy of discussion about how that revolution was perceived? A new book about reporting the Arab Spring, out next month, aims to look at this.”

Read the full article: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/female-war-reporters-were-given-the-softer-side-of-war-2354158.html

October 9, 2011 at 12:49 pm Leave a comment


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