Posts tagged ‘afghanistan’

Be the Change: DOSTI Hand-Stitched Soccer Balls #hwhtw

Here’s a new way to suport women’s economic empowerment: Global Goods Partners’ DOSTI soccer balls, handsewn by Afghan women.

“Afghan women have been renowned for centuries for hand needlework. Now the women of DOSTI, meaning “friendship” in Dari, have harnessed that heritage to handcraft club-quality fair trade soccer balls… Bearing DOSTI’s signature Doves in Flight pattern, each fair trade soccer ball purchased provides meaningful employment for Afghan women.”

Thanks to Gayle Lemmon for the tip! 

Read more, or buy: http://www.globalgoodspartners.org/cart/Details.cfm?ProdID=628

September 8, 2011 at 11:14 am 2 comments

Saving Mothers’ Lives Amid the Afghanistan Drawdown @gaylelemmon #hwhtw

gayle lemmon photoHere’s a brand-new article on maternal health in Afghanistan from Gayle Lemmon and Isobel Coleman in Bloomberg Business Week.  Gayle says, “Turns out that maternal health is one of the best investments the US has made in the country.”

Afghan Women Stand to Lose in U.S. Drawdown

By Isobel Coleman and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Aug. 8 (Bloomberg) — As the U.S. begins withdrawing from Afghanistan, Afghans are wondering whether this is the beginning of the end of serious American engagement.

After spending almost $1 trillion and suffering close to 4,000 American deaths, will Washington cut and run? Or will it seek a “responsible end” to the war, as President Barack Obama has claimed?

The answer will depend in large part on how the U.S. continues to support the Afghan government and people. Americans are understandably tired of financing big, expensive initiatives that are riddled with corruption and can’t be maintained by Afghans themselves. As incoming Ambassador Ryan Crocker said, the objective must be to invest in projects that meet the goal of “sustainable stability.”

In a worrying sign, Washington is on the verge of eviscerating one of its most successful and cost-effective programs: improving maternal health.

Read the full article: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-08-07/afghan-women-stand-to-lose-in-u-s-drawdown-coleman-and-lemmon.html

August 9, 2011 at 12:26 pm Leave a comment

First Afghan Women Pilots in Training

Women have been making strides in the effort to rebuild the Afghan military (see:  Training the First Female Afghan National Army Officers), and now they’re getting wings.  The first class of female military pilot recruits is in training at Lackland AFB near San Antonio, Texas:

Afghan Women Pilots Train At Lackland AFB

Women Break New Ground In Male-Dominated Culture

by Eileen Gonzales

SAN ANTONIO — Lt. Sourya Saleh, Lt Masooma Hussaina, Lt. Mary Sharifzada and Lt. Narges Safari are all in their early 20s. Although they were born with very limited possibilities in a culture dominated by men, they’re now part of a changing dynamic.

“We are going to open the door for our ladies in Afghanistan. it’s a big deal for us to open the door for others that other ladies that have dreams that they can’t do it, we want to show them,” said Lt Sourya Saleh.

“Their journey started about two years ago, when the Afghan army began looking for women to join. Then came the opportunity to become among the first female pilots in the Afghan Air Force…”

Read the full aticle: http://www.ksat.com/news/28535240/detail.html

July 31, 2011 at 12:08 pm Leave a comment

“Women-run Afghan media offer untold side of story”

Another inspiring story from Afghanistan’s women…

Women-run Afghan media offer untold side of story

By Amie Ferris-Rotman

KABUL, July 5 (Reuters) – Farida Nekzad has faced threats of kidnapping, acid attacks and a plot to blow up her apartment since she founded her first news agency in Afghanistan seven years ago….

But the mother-of-one, whose most recent project is a news agency that spearheads coverage of the problems that Afghan women face, is undeterred. Wakht, or ‘Time’ in Nekzad’s native Dari, is one of a handful of majority female media outlets springing up across a country where women’s voices often go unheard.

Read the full article: http://www.trust.org/trustlaw/news/women-run-afghan-media-offer-untold-side-of-story/

July 11, 2011 at 12:48 pm Leave a comment

#DTDW: Highlights, Part 1

Here are some of my favorite quotes from the Democracy that Delivers for Women Conference:

David Chavern: “Business is the answer, not the problem.”

David Chavern: “Countries that treat women badly, do badly.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Women make sure there’s a community to go back to when the war is over.”

Gayle Lemmon: “In tough parts of the world, women turn to business to make sure their children get fed.”

Gayle Lemmon: “Unsung heroines and aspiring entrepreneurs are all around us.”

Mary Schnack: “Women don’t need to be sitting on a dirt floor to need help growing their businesses.”

Mary Schnack: “We need to help women recognize themselves as leaders and be honored as leaders”

Gayle Lemmon: “Afghan women are desperate for peace, but afraid it will come at the price of their right to go to work and school.”

More to come!

June 23, 2011 at 12:18 pm Leave a comment

State of the World’s Mothers 2011

According to the Foundation Center’s Philanthropy News Digest, a new report outlines how global maternal health supports U.S. national security:

“The 2011 Mother’s Index from Save the Children ranks the United States thirty-first among 164 countries in the well-being of mothers and children, as measured by health, education, and economic status. According to State of the World’s Mothers 2011 (42 pages, PDF), Norway, Australia, and Iceland are the three “best places to be a mother,” while eight of the ten “worst” countries to be a mother are in sub-Saharan Africa. Ranked at the very bottom is Afghanistan, where a woman typically has fewer than five years of education and the mortality rate for children under the age of five is 20 percent. The report features essays from former business and military leaders, politicians, academics, and religious leaders, including members of Save the Children’s board, that highlight the effectiveness of low-cost, low-tech strategies designed to improve access to basic health care and which suggest that women’s empowerment is not only a moral imperative, but in the economic, environmental, and national security interest of the United States. ”

Read more: http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/connections/conn_item.jhtml?id=338800008

May 17, 2011 at 12:33 pm Leave a comment

Book Discussion: The Dressmaker of Khair Khana

If you’re in the D.C. area, join the Women’s Foreign Policy Group for a discussion of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana with author (and HWHTW favorite) Gayle Tzemach Lemmon.

“In The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, journalist and author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of Kamela Sediqi, the unlikely breadwinner who became an entrepreneur in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Desperate to support her brothers and sisters and unable to earn a living outside the home, she started a dressmaking business in her living room which offered work to 100 women in her community. Together these unsung heroines made the difference between survival and starvation for their families under Taliban rule.”


Thursday, March 17, 2011, 5:30 p.m.
Reception and Program

Academy for Educational Development
1875 Connecticut Ave., NW, 8th Floor Board Room
Washington, DC

The program will be followed by a book signing with the author, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon.
Space is limited. Advance registration is required.

Click here to register

WFPG Members— $15      Non-Members— $20

March 13, 2011 at 2:30 pm Leave a comment

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